THE CLOCK

STUDIO:  Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

PRODUCTION NUMBER:  1331

PRODUCTION DATES: [Zinneman] August 1, 1944 – August 2, 1944
[Minnelli] September 1, 1944 – November 21, 1944

PRODUCTION COST:   $1,034,207.70

RUNNING TIME:  90 minutes

RELEASE DATE:  May 25, 1945

INITIAL BOX OFFICE:  $2,783,000

The Clock Herald AdThe Clock was Judy’s only non-singing role for MGM, and one of the few times she’s seen in a contemporary story in contemporary clothing. It’s also the last time Judy appeared in a black and white film at MGM.

Judy had wanted to make a purely dramatic film for at least a few years when MGM’s musical producer Arthur Freed greenlit the film with Judy as the star.  Musical stars of the era were not considered to be on the same par as dramatic stars mainly because most of the musicals made were light, fluffy entertainment.  They weren’t considered as “serious” as their more dramatic non-musical counterparts.  However, everyone could see that of all the female musical stars of the time, Judy Garland definitely had the talent to carry a dramatic film.  Freed later commented that The Clock was produced as a lark to give Judy something different do work on after the musicals she had recently been cranking out, including the just completed masterpiece, Meet Me In St. Louis.  

The Clock was definitely a Freed Unit pet project.  It was the unit’s first dramatic film and just about everyone that Freed had gathered to popular his unit was involved.  Freed assigned Jack Conaway as the director but after Conaway became ill he was replaced by Fred Zinnemann.  And that where the trouble began.  Judy and Zinnemann didn’t click at all.  The film was important to her.  She was passionate about the project and wanted the right director to guide her.  Freed later said, “Judy came to see [and said] ‘I don’t know – he must be a good director but I just get nothing.  We have no compatibility.'”  Freed sent for Zinnemann and the director echoed Judy’s sentiments.  The two didn’t click.  It’s been suggested that Judy had in fact been waiting for Vincente Minnelli to become available.  Minnelli had guided her through Meet Me In St. Louis to great success.  Judy felt she could trust his instincts about what was best for her.  By the end of filming the two were in love and well on their way to getting married.

Once Minnelli took control, he tightened up some of the loose ends, added some new characters and more importantly made the city of New York a third character.  Because the film took place in New York City, and it was the fast romance between a soldier on a 48 hour leave (played by Robert Walker) and a local office worker (Judy), Minnelli wisely saw the city as an influence on the motives and machinations of the young couple.  Seen through the soldier’s innocent eyes the city is seen as huge and imposing.  Seen through the eyes of the office worker it’s more intimate.  Minnelli later said, “I decided at once to make New York itself another character in the story and I introduced a number of crazy people.  I used a lot of improvisation, not actually having a new script written, but instead I developed new ideas, new situations and dialogue as I went along.”

With everyone happy, filming proceeded smoothly.  The result is a lovely wartime love story that has stood the test of time and is still as enjoyable today as it was when it was released.  Most of the wartime romances made during this have not aged well due to their in-your-face patriotism.  But thanks to the real chemistry between Judy and Robert, and Minnellie’s sensitive direction, The Clock is a minor masterpiece of the genre.   

When The Clock was released on May 25, 1945, the appetite for this type of wartime romance had waned.  World War II was nearing its end and since it was obvious the Allies were going to win, audiences were anxious to get back to normal.  The urgency of a young man and woman during a 48 hour leave wasn’t as timely as it had been.  The film still popular, made a good profit, and got glowing reviews.  But audiences preferred to hear Judy sing, and that’s what they got for the rest of her tenure at MGM. 

TIMELINE PART ONE:

  • June 16, 1944:  Judy’s first day of work on The Clock.  She had “silent wardrobe and hair test.”  Time called: 3 p.m.; dismissed: 4:55 p.m.
  • July 6 through July 21, 1944:  Judy rehearsed, recorded, and filmed her guest spot in Ziegfeld Follies, the satirical “A Great Lady Has An Interview.”
  • July 31, 1944:  Judy resumed work on The Clock.  She had “silent photographic test.”  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 3:30 p.m.  That night Judy had a recording session for Decca Records from 7 p.m. to 10:15 p.m.  She and Bing Crosby duetted on “You’ve Got Me Where You Want Me,” and “Mine.”
  • August 1, 1944:  The first day of filming consisted of scenes shot ot the “Magazine Stand,” “Exterior Tony’s Shop,” and “Exterior Drug Store.”  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 4:20 p.m.
  • August 2, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Arcade,” “Exterior Drug Store,” “Exterior Tony’s Shop,” and “Interior Tony’s Shop” sets.  Time called: 11:30 a.m.; dismissed: 5:50 p.m.
  • August 3, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Drugstore” and “Interior Tony’s Repair Shop” sets.  Time called: 10:30 a.m.; 12:05-1:05 lunch; 1:05-1:20 – Judy arrived on the set; 1:20-1:40 – Judy was getting intro wardrobe; dismissed: 5:10 p.m. 
  • August 4, 1944:  Judy was ill and didn’t work.  The assistant director’s notes state: “JG reported sick: Miss Garland phoned Glazer last night after dinner that she was feeling a little ill and didn’t think she’d be able to work today.  Glazer phoned her mother’s house before nine this morning and learned Miss Garland had spent the restless night with a temperature of 1010, and they were waiting for a doctor to call.  Company went ahead and made shots with Robert Walker as planned.”
  • August 5, 1944:  Judy was out sick.
  • August 7, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Station,” “Exterior tony’s Shop, and “Exterior Top of Bus” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 6:50 p.m.
  • August 8, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Top of Bus,” and “Exterior Pond” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m.  The assistant director’s notes state: “9:55-10:40 – Waiting for Miss Garland – due 10:00; 10:40-10:45 – Miss Garland arrived on set – getting into wardrobe.”  Dismissed: 5:50 p.m.
  • August 9, 1944:  Judy was out sick.  Shooting was canceled for the day.
  • August 10, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Living Room – Alice’s Apartment” set.  Time called: 1 p.m.; dismissed: 5:55 p.m.
  • August 11, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Living Room – Alice’s Apartment” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 5:45 p.m.
  • August 12, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Living Room and Bedroom – Alice’s Apartment” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 3:20 p.m.
  • August 14, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Pond” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 6:30 p.m.
  • August 15, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Pond,” “Interior Museum,” and “interior Gallery-Rodin’s Thinker” sets, the “scene where Joe pulls boy out of water – Alice-Policeman-Children and crowd.”  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 6:05 p.m.
  • August 16, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Rodin’s Thinker Room,” “Interior French Gallery,” and “2nd Gallery” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m.  The assistant director’s notes state: “10:00-10:25 – Waiting for Miss Garland – onset: [She was] in dressing room getting into wardrobe – finishing fixing hair, makeup, etc. 5:35-5:40 – Discussing setup – set was decided upon and scene could have been shot by 6:30 but Miss Garland did not feel well and felt she could not work that late.”  Dismissed: 5:50 p.m.
  • August 17, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior French Gallery,” and “Exterior Bus Stop” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m. The assistant director’s notes state: “10:10-11:30 – Waiting for Miss Garland – due 10:00, arrived in studio 9:35; on stage at 11:10 and getting into wardrobe, etc. in dressing room to 11:30.  2:35-3:00 – Miss Garland not feeling well; rehearse scene with Bob Walker to 2:50; looked at the process test scene on moviola until 3:00; Miss Garand and Bob Walker dismissed at 3:00 p.m.”
  • August 18 & 19, 1944:  Both Judy and Robert Walker were out sick although on August 19 Judy performed in a “Command performance” radio show with Danny Kaye.
  • August 21, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Bus Stop” set which was an indoor “process” (rear projection) set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 7 p.m.
  • August 22, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Bus Top” and “Exterior Street” sets.  Both were indoor “process” (rear projection) sets.  Time called: 11 a.m.  The assistant director’s notes state: “11:35-11:40 – Rehearsing – using Miss Garland’s stand-in; [Judy] arrived at studio 10:20, due at 11:00; [Was] on set at 11:55; 11:55-12:06 – Rehearsing with Miss Garland.”  Dismissed: 5:45 p.m.
  • August 23, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Street – Bus,” “Interior Egyptian Room,” and “Crusaders Tomb” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m.  The assistant director’s notes state: “Judy arrived at the studio at 8:30 a.m. and from 10:15-10:26 she finished getting into wardrobe and fixing her hair, etc.”  Dismissed: 5:40 p.m.
  • August 24, 1944:  The film’s director, Fred Zinnemann, was removed from the production and replaced with Vincente Minnelli.  The company was on layoff on this day and the 25th.  On the 26th Judy wasn’t needed and wasn’t on cal.
  • August 28, 1944:  Judy and Robert Walker posed for publicity stills for use in the poster art at MGM’s publicity department.  Time called: 12:45 p.m.; Judy arrived at 1:30 p.m.; dismissed: 4:30 p.m.
  • August 29, through 31, 1944:  Judy had three days off.
  • September 1, 1944:  Filming resumed under new director Vincente Minnelli on the “Interior Rodin’s Thinker,” and “Interior French Gallery.”  Time called: 10 a.m.; Judy arrived at 11:02 a.m.  Judy was in makeup at 8:55 a.m. but they gave her a wrong fall for her hair, thus the delay.  Judy arrived at 10:53 a.m. and was on the set ready for filming at 11:02 a.m.  Dismissed: 6:40 p.m.
  • September 2, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior French Gallery,” “Interior Another Gallery,” and “Interior Egyptian Room” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m.; Judy arrived at 10:08 a.m.; dismissed: 3:30 p.m.  Judy was dismissed at 3:30 to keep a hair appointment.
  • September 5, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Egyptian Room,” and “Interior Crusaders Tomb” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 6:20 p.m.
  • September 6, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Alice’s Apartment,” and “Interior Crusaders Tomb” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 6:20 p.m.
  • September 7, 1944:  Filming was scheduled for the “Interior Alice’s Apartment” set but Judy called in sick.
  • September 8, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Alice’s Apartment” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.  The assistant director’s notes state: “Miss Garland called for 10 a.m. – arrived 10:13 – ready rehearsal; 10:13-10:30 – Rehearsed for director; 10:42-10:48 – Additional line and light after rehearsal; 10:42-10:49 – wait for director to return from projection room – meanwhile finish makeup, hair, and wardrobe for Miss Garland.  Director back at 10:45; continued waiting for Miss Garland to be ready for shooting – ready at 10:48.”  Dismissed: 6:15 p.m.
  • September 9, 1944:   Filming tonitioued on the ‘Interior Alice’s Apartment set.  Time called: 1:00 p.m.  The assistant director’s notes state: “Note: original call for Miss Garland was 10:00 a.m.  But [she was] ill in morning and unable to report on set until 1:00 p.m.  At 9:25 Mis Garland informed asst. director that she was ill this morning.  Will notify company later this morning at 11:00 if she will be able to report for shooting this afternoon.  11:30: Miss Garland phoned she would report to studio for shooting after lunch.  Company continued to standby.  12:45-1:10 – Wait for Miss Garland to finish makeup, hairdress, 1:10-1:50 – Miss Garland on set.  Rehearsals started for benefit of both dolly camera and Director.  2:05-2:35 – Wait for Miss Garland and Brady to get into wardrobe – finish hairdress and final makeup touches; Scene of Alice alone in room – reflecting on date with soldier.”  Dismissed: 6:20 p.m.
  • September 11, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Alice’s Apartment,” “Park Path,” “15th Ave. at 79th,” and “Interior Penn Station” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 4:10 p.m.
  • September 12 through 14, 1944:  Filming was canceled for these three days “due to illness of director.”
  • September 15, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Penn Station” set.  Time called: 11 a.m.; dismissed: 5:45 p.m
  • September 16, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Penn Station (Lobby and Stairs)” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 5:50 p.m.
  • September 18, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Penn Station Lobby” set.  time called: 10 a.m.  Judy arrived at 10:30 a.m., and from 10:40 to 11 a.m. she was getting into her wardrobe.  Dismissed: 5:58 p.m.
  • September 19, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Penn Station Lobby and Gates” set.  This was the scene where Judy and Robert Walker’s characters meet for the first time.  Time called: 1 p.m.; dismissed: 5:50 p.m.
  • September 20, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Penn Station Gates,” and “Exterior and Interior Tony’s Repair Shop” sets.  Time called 10 a.m.; Judy arrived at 10:25 a.m.; dismissed: 6 p.m.
  • September 21, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Tony’s Repair Shop,” and “Interior Magazine Stand” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 6:05 p.m.
  • September 22, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Magazine Stand,” “Exterior Station,” and Exterior Top of Bus” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m.  The assistant director’s notes state: “Miss Garland phoned Al Shenberg early this morning that her tooth was troubling her, that she had an eleven o’clock appointment with the dentist and would not be able to come in until 1:30; company could not work without Miss Garland. [she] arrived on lot at 12:30; on stage: 1:35; ready on set at 2:00 p.m.”  Dismissed: 6 p.m.
  • September 23, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Top of Bus” and “Bus Stop” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m.; Judy arrived at 10:33 a.m.  The assistant director’s notes state: “2:43-2:57 – Miss Garland discussing neuralgia pain with doctor/Fixing hair and makeup.”  Dismissed: 6 p.m.
  • September 24, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Bus Stop” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; Judy arrived at 10:14 a.m.; dismissed: 6 p.m.
  • September 25, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Bus Stop” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; Judy arrived at 10:14 a.m.; dismissed: 6 p.m.
  • September 26, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Bus” set.  Time called: 10 alm.; Judy arrived on the set at 10 a.m.  The assistant director’s notes state: “1:30-2:12: Waiting for Miss Garland; Miss Garland knew that we had only one other shot to do this afternoon due to Robert Walker’s illness.  [She] arrived on stage at 1:57; ready at 2:12.”  Dismissed: 3 p.m.
  • September 27, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior and Exterior Bus – pro treadmill,” and “Interior Hotel Astor Lobby” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m.; Judy arrived at 10:18 a.m.; dismissed: 4:20 p.m.
  • September 28, 1944:  Judy was on standby until 6:05 p.m. but was not needed and didn’t film any scenes.
  • September 29, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Telephone Booth and Switchboard,” “Interior Astor Revolving Doors,” and Interior Small Restaurant” sets.  Time called: 1 p.m.; Judy arrived on time; dismissed: 6:05 p.m.
  • September 30, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Small Restaurant” set (the scene with Judy and Robert Walker at dinner with Roger Edens playing the piano player).  Time called: 10 a.m.; Judy arrived at 10:14 a.m.; dismissed: 6:15 p.m.

TIMELINE PART TWO:

  • October 2, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Small Restaurant” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; Judy arrived at 10:16 a.m.; dismissed: 4 p.m.
  • October 3, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Al’s House and Street” and “Exterior Riverside Park” sets.  Judy arrived at the studio at 8:40 a.m. and was on the set at 10:20 a.m. for her 10 a.m. call.  The assistant director’s notes state: “10:20-10:40 – Rehearsing; 10:40-11:25 – Line and Light (Miss Garland getting into wartobe, fixing hair and makeup, etc.); 11:25-11:35 – Miss Garland getting ready; 11:35-11:40 – rehearsing; 11:40-11:46 – Line and Light; 11:46-12:28 – Shooting 11 takes; 12:28-12:30 – stills (publicity still shot on the set); dismissed at 12:30 (lunch as from 12:30-1:30 p.m).”
  • October 4, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Riverside Park” set.  Time called: 10:30 a.m.; Judy arrived at 10:25 a.m.; dismissed: 6:55 p.m.
  • October 5, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Riverside Park” set.  Time called: 10:45 a.m.; Judy arrived on time; dismissed: 6:32 p.m.
  • October 6, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Riverside Park” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; Judy arrived at 10:07 a.m.; dismissed: 5:55 p.m.
  • October 7, 1944:  The planned scene on the  “Interior U.S.O.” set was not shot on this day.  The assistant director’s notes state: “Miss Garland arrived on lot at 9:15.  At 9:30 she phoned Al Shenberg from dressing room saying she felt ill.  Mr. Shenberg asked her to get madeup, etc., as we would finish the set before lunch or soon after.  A little later, Miss Garland phoned again and said she really felt bad.  Mr. Shenberg sent Dr. Jones to her.  Dr Jones reported that Miss Garland was running a temperature of 101 and sent her home.”
  • October 9, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior U.S.O.,” “Riverside Park,” and “Interior Subway Train” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m.; Judy arrived at 10:06 a.m.; dismissed: 5:55 p.m.
  • October 10, 1944:  Judy was out sick.
  • October 11, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Subway Platform at 42nd Street” set.  Time called: 10 a.m; Judy arrived at 10:15 a.m.; dismissed: 5:40 p.m.
  • October 12, 1944:  Judy was on standby but didn’t have any work for this day.
  • October 13, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Subway Platform – 33rd St.” set.  The “train comes in – Alice goes through turnstile and up stairs.”  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 6:30 p.m.
  • October 14, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Subway Platform” set.  Time called; 2 p.m.; dismissed: 5:40 p.m.
  • October 16, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Dingy Restaurant” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 6:05 p.m.
  • October 17, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Marriage License Bureau” set.  Time called: 10 a.m. dismissed: 5:50 p.m.
  • October 18, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Lobby Medical Bldg.” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 5:50 .m.
  • October 19, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Marriage License Bureau” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 6 p.m.
  • October 20, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Laboratory and Corridor Outside” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 6:15 p.m.
  • October 21, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Room 387,” and “Interior Marriage Chapel” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 6:25 p.m.
  • October 23, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Marriage Chapel” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 6:10 p.m.
  • October 24, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Marriage Chapel” and “Interior Church” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 5:50 p.m.
  • October 25, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Church” set.  Time called: 10 a.m; dismissed: 6:20 p.m.
  • October 26, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Hotel Bedroom” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 6 p.m.
  • October 27, 1944:  Judy was out sick.
  • October 28, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Hotel Suite” and “Interior Taxi Cab” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m. dismissed: 6 p.m.
  • October 30, 1044:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Riverside Drive” and “Street Corner” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 12 p.m.
  • October 31, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Restaurant, B’way and 41st,” and “Exterior Another Restaurant” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m.  The assistant director’s notes state: “Judy Garland phoned Harry Poppe last night that she would not be on the set until about 2:00 this afternoon as she would be at the hospital with her mother who was undergoing an operation.  Arrived on set at 1:20.”  Dismissed: 4:55 p.m.
  • November 1, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Saint Faith Episcopal Church” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 5:15 p.m.
  • November 2, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Seal Pool” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 6:05 p.m.  The assistant director’s notes state: “[At] 6:05 company dismissed without getting shot as Miss Garland looked too tired; cameraman changed key light, etc., but this did not help and it was decided inadvisable to photograph her.”
  • November 3, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Seal Pool” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 12:15 p.m.
  • November 6, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior Street Riverside Drive,” and “Interior Milk Truck” sets.  Judy arrived at MGM at 9:45 a.m., was on the set at 11:15 a.m., and was ready at 11:15 a.m. (for a 10 a.m. call).  Dismissed: 5:55 p.m.  Later that night Judy appeared on the “Democratic National Committee” program broadcast on both CBS and NBC Radio.  Judy sang “You Gotta Get Out And Vote.”
  • November 7, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Milk Truck” set.  Judy was on the lot at 8:55 a.m., on the set at 10:25 a.m. from makeup, ready at 10:40 a.m. (for a 10 a.m. call).  Dismissed: 6 p.m.
  • November 8, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Lunch Room” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 6:05 p.m.
  • November 9, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Lunch Room,” and “Interior Milk Truck” sets.  Judy arrived at the studio at 9 a.m. and was on the set and ready at 10:30 a.m. (from makeup) for a 10 a.m. call.  Dismissed: 5:50 p.m.
  • November 10, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Milk Truck” set.  Judy arrived at the studio at 9 a.m.; she was on the set at 10:47 a.m. (from makeup) for a 10 a.m. call.  Dismissed: 6:05 p.m.
  • November 11, 1944:  Judy was out sick.
  • November 13 through 15, 1944:  Judy had a rare three days off.
  • November 16, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior NY Street – Flat Tire” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 6 p.m.
  • November 17, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Exterior NY Street – Flat Tire” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; dismissed: 5:55 p.m.
  • November 18, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Tenement Hall,” “Interior Fireside Circular Stairs,” and Interior Al’s Living Room” sets.  Time called: 10 a.m.; Judy arrived at 10:25 a.m.; dismissed: 6:10 p.m.
  • November 20, 1944:  Filming continued on the “Interior Al Henry Kitchen” set.  Time called: 10 a.m.; Judy arrived at 10:33 a.m.; dismissed: 7:15 p.m.
  • November 21, 1944:  The final day of filming consisted of scenes shot on the “Exterior Loading Platform” set.  Time called: 6 p.m.; dismissed: 10:30 p.m. 

FACTOIDS:

  • The film was released in the United Kingdom as Under The Clock.
  • The cost of the Pennsylvania Station set on Stage 27 was $66,450.
  • Sadly, the original Penn Station in New York City was torn down in 1963 to make way for what is now the Madison Square Garden complex. The lower level tracks remain basically the same.
  • Producer Arthur Freed, musical director Roger Edens, and screenwriter Robert Nathan all make cameo appearances in the film, a la Alfred Hitchcock.
  • Moyna MacGill, who plays the “Woman in Restaurant” was Angela Lansbury’s mother!
  • MGM purchased the unpublished short story in 1943 for $50,000 at the urging of producer Arthur Freed.
  • Martha Green wrote an early draft of the screenplay, but Freed did not like it so he assigned Joseph Schrank and Robert Nathan who wrote most of what we see in the film today.
  • The unofficial theme song of the film is “If I Had You” which is used in the underscore. Judy recorded the song for Decca Records on July 7, 1945.

CAST:

Judy Garland as Alice Mayberry

Robert Walker as Corporal Joe Allen

James Gleason as Al Henry

Keenan Wynn as The Drunk

Marshall Thompson as Bill

Lucille Gleason as Mrs. Al Henry

Ruth Brady as Helen

Uncredited: Moyna MacGill as “Woman in Restaurant”; Ruby Dandridge

CREW:

Produced by: Arthur Freed

Directed by: Vincente Minnelli

Assistant Director: Al Shenberg

Screenplay by: Robert Nathan and Joseph Schrank

Based on a story by Paul Gallico and Pauline Gallico

Score by: George Bassman

Recording Director: Douglas Shearer

Art Directors: Cedric Gibbons, William Ferrari

Set Decoration: Edwin B. Willis and Mac Alper

Costumes superviced by: Irene, Associate: Marion Herwood Keyes

Makeup: Dorothy Ponedel

Director of Photography: George Folsey

Special Effects: A. Arnold Gillespie, Warren Newcombe

Editor: George White

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